Unmonitored cams

Rated 3.80/5 based on 670 customer reviews

Everything from calls to couriers to messengers, ignored. Just sayin’.)Once you’ve got a open communication channel going with the drivers insurance company, you’re more or less set for the immediate future. In my case I had initially provided my Blue Cross Medical Coverage for all initial medical visits. See, Blue Cross decided that since the incident occurred on a roadway with a car involved, that my auto insurance coverage should actually take precedence. They said in that case they’d happily cover it, but since I did have a car with auto insurance, I had to get my Allstate Auto Insurance to cover it.He just pretended the incident never happened, never even reported it. My employers coverage is typically excellent, and thus by the recommendation of everyone involved I just gave my health insurance card initially and then would let the at fault drivers auto coverage sort out re-imbursement later. They essentially wanted Allstate Auto Coverage (ironically, the same as the at fault driver) to cover any and all costs of the incident – merely because a vehicle was involved. Of course, when I rang up Allstate, they said that while they could ‘entertain’ the concept of covering it – ultimately my coverage would only go up to

Everything from calls to couriers to messengers, ignored. Just sayin’.)Once you’ve got a open communication channel going with the drivers insurance company, you’re more or less set for the immediate future. In my case I had initially provided my Blue Cross Medical Coverage for all initial medical visits. See, Blue Cross decided that since the incident occurred on a roadway with a car involved, that my auto insurance coverage should actually take precedence. They said in that case they’d happily cover it, but since I did have a car with auto insurance, I had to get my Allstate Auto Insurance to cover it.He just pretended the incident never happened, never even reported it. My employers coverage is typically excellent, and thus by the recommendation of everyone involved I just gave my health insurance card initially and then would let the at fault drivers auto coverage sort out re-imbursement later. They essentially wanted Allstate Auto Coverage (ironically, the same as the at fault driver) to cover any and all costs of the incident – merely because a vehicle was involved. Of course, when I rang up Allstate, they said that while they could ‘entertain’ the concept of covering it – ultimately my coverage would only go up to $1,000 since I wasn’t driving, nor was my car involved.Firstly, ensure you keep a log of every medical visit you have.But more importantly – ensure that that medical office notes the time of the appointment. See, when it comes time for the insurance company to reimburse you for lost work time it’s critical to have that detail by signed by that medical office.My objective was not to sue anyone, so if that is your objective – you’d likely take very different steps. Both in the medical sense, but also in the bike equipment sense. In the days after the crash, the majority of my time was spent either at the hospital/medical offices, or on the phone with medical offices.I was fairly astounded at how long the lag times could be for things like MRI’s and doctors appointments, due to the fact that I wasn’t considered to be in danger of dropping dead (though, saying I got hit by a car did get me some sympathy in getting earlier appointments). The first few offices were generally content with giving me a large pile of extra strength Advil and calling it a day.

||

Everything from calls to couriers to messengers, ignored. Just sayin’.)Once you’ve got a open communication channel going with the drivers insurance company, you’re more or less set for the immediate future. In my case I had initially provided my Blue Cross Medical Coverage for all initial medical visits. See, Blue Cross decided that since the incident occurred on a roadway with a car involved, that my auto insurance coverage should actually take precedence. They said in that case they’d happily cover it, but since I did have a car with auto insurance, I had to get my Allstate Auto Insurance to cover it.

He just pretended the incident never happened, never even reported it. My employers coverage is typically excellent, and thus by the recommendation of everyone involved I just gave my health insurance card initially and then would let the at fault drivers auto coverage sort out re-imbursement later. They essentially wanted Allstate Auto Coverage (ironically, the same as the at fault driver) to cover any and all costs of the incident – merely because a vehicle was involved. Of course, when I rang up Allstate, they said that while they could ‘entertain’ the concept of covering it – ultimately my coverage would only go up to $1,000 since I wasn’t driving, nor was my car involved.

Firstly, ensure you keep a log of every medical visit you have.

But more importantly – ensure that that medical office notes the time of the appointment. See, when it comes time for the insurance company to reimburse you for lost work time it’s critical to have that detail by signed by that medical office.

,000 since I wasn’t driving, nor was my car involved.Firstly, ensure you keep a log of every medical visit you have.But more importantly – ensure that that medical office notes the time of the appointment. See, when it comes time for the insurance company to reimburse you for lost work time it’s critical to have that detail by signed by that medical office.My objective was not to sue anyone, so if that is your objective – you’d likely take very different steps. Both in the medical sense, but also in the bike equipment sense. In the days after the crash, the majority of my time was spent either at the hospital/medical offices, or on the phone with medical offices.I was fairly astounded at how long the lag times could be for things like MRI’s and doctors appointments, due to the fact that I wasn’t considered to be in danger of dropping dead (though, saying I got hit by a car did get me some sympathy in getting earlier appointments). The first few offices were generally content with giving me a large pile of extra strength Advil and calling it a day.

Additionally, I kept a record of every medical bill in an Excel spreadsheet, to be able to easily reference. This made life so much easier later on, having an easy to reference folder in my computer full of scanned invoices, lined up to the Excel sheet.

With that intro, I wanted to break down some of the pieces that may be of interest to everyone – should you find yourself in the same situation as I one day.

Keep in mind I’m not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV.

Since I’m a consultant and bill hourly, this is lost time…and thus lost money.

In addition to the initial medical frenzy (I explain more in depth in that follow-up link a few days after the crash), you’ll likely have a host of insurance related calls and probably a small bit of police related activity.

Leave a Reply